Is the Camino de Santiago Good for a Family Holiday?

Is the Camino de Santiago Good for a Family Holiday? image

Many people are walking the Camino as a family, taking their children or teenagers along with them. Walking the Camino with your kids as a family holiday is a great way to open their minds to another culture.  It will also allow you to create lifelong memories and spend some real quality time with your kids, without the distraction of technology.  If you decide to walk the Camino with your kids as a family holiday a  few practical steps should be taken to ensure everybody has a safe and fun experience. The first thing to note is that the Camino can be very physically demanding. While teenagers should be well able for the exertion required, younger children will find some of the 'ways' too challenging. In which case, Follow the Camino will help you choose a route appropriate to your family's capabilities.

Before you set off, it might be a good idea to remind your children of the significance, religious and otherwise, that the Camino has for many walkers. It is also important to motivate your children at the beginning. Everyone finds the first few days hard and there can be a temptation to quit. But once they've gotten over their initial doubts they'll start to really get into the swing of things. 

Kids on the Camino

Luggage Transfer

Carrying a pack on the Camino can be gruelling for youngsters. Luckily, we offer a luggage transfer service which ensures your bags will always be waiting for you at your next hotel. This means you only have to pack a light bag to carry daily supplies. Carrying a scooter can allow your kids to have fun AND cover ground! Something to note is that the Camino is not about glamour. We recommend that parents and children leave their more fashionable clothes at home.

You can still bring something nice to wear for the night time, but try to buy clothes that you don't care what happens to them and can afford to be thrown away. Young people love their jeans but these are not appropriate clothing for hiking. They're not warm enough when it's cold, they're too warm when it's hot, and they retain water like a sponge. Make sure your children have sturdy, comfortable footwear that has been broken in ahead of time - blisters are no fun.  

Staying Sun Safe

Spain, as I'm sure you know, can get very hot and younger people may not have the experience to know when they need to rehydrate. Pack lots of water - there are fountains scattered along the way but you should have your own supplies as well - and make sure the kids drink at regular intervals. There is also very little shelter from the sun on some sections of the Camino, so ensure that your children wear hats and strong sun-block. Many families choose to walk the Camino in April or September when the weather is pleasant but not overly hot. So, we would suggest to go during mid-term breaks, as this is a preferred time to go for many families.  

Distance Per Day

Young children, in particular can have low attention spans. It's important to set them reasonable targets for the day (for example, say the group will walk six kilometres and then have lunch) to keep their motivation up. A pack of cards, reading material or something similar also helps to keep them happy during downtimes. If you're feeling adventurous, you could walk with a donkey, which can be a fun way of encouraging kids to embrace the adventure and also has practical advantages. The donkey walk is available on the Le Puy Route

Which Route is Best for Your Family

There are several choices of routes and start points on the Camino so you can customise the walk to your exact needs. If you're walking with young children, perhaps the section of the French Way from Arzua to Santiago de Compostela would suit you. This route gives you the chance to walk the final stretch of the Camino and, at 37 kilometres over four days, it shouldn't be overly demanding for the little ones. The French Way is the most traditional route taking walkers through the green hilly landscapes of Galicia, eucalyptus wood-lands and typical rural villages. Teenagers may enjoy cycling the route but again the choice is yours. Click here to view our various route options available. You can also find them by clicking on the ''Camino Tours'' tab at the top of the page.  

Accommodation 

Finding accommodation on the Camino route can be stressful enough as an individual walker, let alone when you have a family in tow. However, when you book the Camino through us, you can relax knowing you're guaranteed specially selected accommodation that will suit your family's needs. Usually, you will arrive at your lodgings in the afternoon, giving you and your family plenty of time to rest, have a refreshing shower, enjoy dinner or visit the local village. Your young ones should be tired enough to leave you to enjoy a couple of hours of "free time". By carefully planning your Camino trip you can ensure that it will be fun, hassle-free and rewarding for the whole family.

Don’t just take our word for it however, here is a testimonial from a father who walked the first section of the Camino Frances with his 10 year old son and plans to do more:

“A spectacular trip. Thank you for setting this up on short notice -- literally one of the best things I've ever done. Joaquin had an amazing time and we loved the journey, the people and of course the time together. He wants to finish before he is 18, so that means a few more trips.”

John and Joaquin Stubbs, USA

Feel free to check out our article on Planning Your Day Along The Camino Trail

If you have any more questions about any of our walking holidays or our services, please don't hesitate to contact us at info@followthecamino.com

Follow the Camino organises walking and cycling holidays in Europe for adventure seekers from all over the world. Since 2006, we’ve offered a great range of manageable walks and cycles for all age groups, in particular on the famous Camino de Santiago. We were the first ever tour operator to operate the Camino de Santiago by creating manageable sections along the main routes to Santiago de Compostela. We are often copied but never equalled!

To find out which route might be best for you, contact our Camino Planners through the form on the top-right-hand side of the page to get your free customised Camino itinerary.



Posted By:


Umberto di Venosa

Umberto founded Follow The Camino 10 years ago so, his life has been all things Camino de Santiago for over a decade now. Meaning he is basically an encyclopedia of all things Camino. We challenge you to ask him something he doesn't know the answer to.

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